Safe Access

There are a number of safety and security issues related to access to the LA River including:

  • Safe and direct access to the water.
  • Safe and direct access to exit the channel.
  • Flood warning system in high flow conditions.

During

  • Regular operating hours during the day.
  • Special event hours both day and night.

The operation and maintenance of the LA River would need to match the standard for a large scale urban park in all cities along the 51 miles, with staffing including security, operations, maintenance, public guides and programming personnel.

Accessibility, visibility and programming are interlinked components to creating a safe environment along the river in addition to flood control. While the overriding safety concern for the River is to ensure the River is designed to accommodate and maintain sustainable flood protection measures there are other concerns that must be addressed to make the river a safe place for the communities that share the river. To create a welcoming and inviting open space to all, the river cannot be fortified, instead utilizing proven practices that create a sense of welcome and enhance public safety without relying on barriers alone: Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design, or CPTED. Simply put, CPTED strategies seek to increase public safety by considering the surrounding environmental context. Areas that are poorly lit or limit visibility, for example, offer opportunity for crime and undesirable behavior. CPTED advocates design factors such as creating clear site lines, setting up controls for buildings and parking and bike lots, and providing sufficient lighting so people can observe their surroundings. Most importantly, CPTED seeks to create a public environment with “eyes on the street” or in this case “the River” in order to discourage crime. Strategies that are specific to the River design are the incorporation of crossings at regular intervals, connectivity to public transit and neighborhoods and social programming strategies that encourage people to observe the River. Accessibility, visibility and programming are interlinked components to creating a safe environment along the river in addition to flood control. While the overriding safety concern for the River is to ensure the River is designed to accommodate and maintain sustainable flood protection measures there are other concerns that must be addressed to make the river a safe place for the communities that share the river. To create a welcoming and inviting open space to all, the river cannot be fortified, instead there are proven practices that create a sense of welcome and enhance public safety that do not rely on barriers alone. These tactics are known as Crime Prevention Through Environmental Design or CPTED. Simply put, CPTED strategies seek to increase public safety by considering the surrounding environmental context. Areas that are poorly lit or limit visibility, for example, offer opportunity for crime and undesirable behavior. CPTED advocates design factors such as creating clear site lines, setting up controls for buildings and parking and bike lots, and providing sufficient lighting so people can observe their surroundings. Most importantly, CPTED seeks to create a public environment with “eyes on the street” or in this case “the River” in order to discourage crime. Strategies that are specific to the River design are the incorporation of crossings at regular intervals, connectivity to public transit and neighborhoods and social programming strategies that encourage people to observe the River.